David Hume Kennerly Named Presidential Scholar

The University of Arizona has announced the appointment of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and photojournalist David Hume Kennerly as a UA Presidential Scholar. He will be based at the Center for Creative Photography.

Kennerly has been a photographer on the front lines of history for six decades. He won the Pulitzer Prize in Journalism for Feature Photography at the age of 25, and he later became the chief White House photographer during President Gerald R. Ford's administration. His body of work includes images from 12 presidential campaigns, several wars, including Vietnam, and many other significant historical moments. He was also a close friend of Ansel Adams, one of the founders of the Center for Creative Photography.

"The images captured by David Hume Kennerly document some of the most important moments in history over the past 60 years, and they have changed how several generations have viewed the world," said UA President Robert C. Robbins. "We are honored to have David share his experience with our students and community."

"We are thrilled that President Robbins has selected David Kennerly as a Presidential Scholar," said Center for Creative Photography Director Anne Breckenridge Barrett. "This appointment signals not only the strong relationship between the CCP and the University of Arizona, but also the Center's commitment to connect the relevance of today’s most significant photographers with the legacy we steward."

The honorary appointment exemplifies the university's commitment to advancing the meaning and understanding of interdisciplinary work in the arts, humanities and social sciences – disciplines that are seen as critical to success in the emerging global economy.

"What an honor," Kennerly said. "Thanks to President Robbins for making me the first-ever University of Arizona Presidential Scholar. In doing so, he is recognizing visual history as a key element in teaching where we've been as a country and society, where we are today and where we are heading. Pairing the Center for Creative Photography with the university’s courses in the arts, social sciences, and humanities will produce informative, entertaining, and unique programming and lectures. I look forward to bringing some of the history-makers featured in my photographs to the university, where they will share their experiences and perspectives with students and the community."

As a UA Presidential Scholar, Kennerly will work with the Center for Creative Photography to craft a series of lectures and events that draw on his expertise and span campus disciplines.

"We expect these events to serve as community activators, bringing together diverse groups of people for dialogue," Robbins said.