Exhibition

​​ ​
​ ​
Nan Letènite (In Eternity), 2021,  ​ ​ © Widline Cadet, from the Seremoni Disparisyon (Ritual [Dis]Appearance) series,  Collection of the artist.
​ ​ ​

When

10 a.m. July 20, 2022 to 5 p.m. Feb. 12, 2023

Showcasing more than 70 portraits, landscapes, self-portraits, and family archival images, And Let It Remain So: Women of the African Diaspora presents the nuanced perspectives of five photographers who are exploring their experiences of the African Diaspora, defined by the voluntary and forced movement of Africans and their descendants over centuries through waves of migration and enslavement.

Featured works by Widline Cadet, Jasmine Clarke, Hellen Gaudence, Nadiya I. Nacordia, and Sasha Phyars-Burgess reflect specific locales, general memories, and multilayered family experiences, drawing on elements from the past and present to consider an imagined future. Experienced collectively, these dynamic photographs illuminate shared and separate understandings of family and history, place and displacement, migration and mobility, and belonging and community, all informed by individual diasporic realities.

The exhibition is curated by Aaron Turner, a regular collaborator with the Center for Creative Photography and an African-American photographer and educator based in Arkansas. Turner’s own photography focuses on the Arkansas and Mississippi Deltas and his reflections on the place of the Civil Rights movement within his and his family’s experience. He is an Assistant Professor of Art at University of Arkansas, School of Art, and the Director of the Center for Art as Lived Experience.

And Let it Remain So: Women of the African Diaspora is organized by Phoenix Art Museum and the Center for Creative Photography. It is made possible through the generosity of the Museum’s Circles of Support and Museum Members.

ccp and phoenix art logo
​​ ​
​ ​
​ ​ ​ ​ Alanna Airitam, "Saint Sugar Hill", 2017, courtesy of and © Alanna Airitam
​ ​ ​

When

10 a.m. April 16, 2022 to 4 p.m. Oct. 29, 2022
Alanna Airitam’s photographic project, “The Golden Age” celebrates a vision of Black Americans that is uplifting, inspiring, and empowering. In ten luscious and elegant large-scale portraits, the artist features contemporary African Americans as symbolic saints who are simultaneously magnificent and powerful.
 
The title refers to an era of portrait painting when Dutch Old Masters like Rembrandt van Rijn and Johannes Vermeer created images of the merchant class to highlight their sitters’ stature and wealth. Airitam uses the trappings of these centuries-old oil paintings--with their dramatic lighting, rich fabrics, and symbolic items--in contemporary portraits. She combines historical references with the Harlem Renaissance period of artistic efflorescence in the early 20th century; each portrait is given a fictional title, combining “Saint” with a Harlem, New York, street name. “This act of reawakening and reconfirming value in one’s self-identity helped me resist the despondency I was experiencing from the increasing number of violent acts against the Black community in America,” says Airitam. "In this way, art has been an act of rebellion and a source of activism for me.”
 
“The Golden Age” belongs to a larger discussion about omission and erasure of Black experiences within the telling of North American history and the damaging impact of art historical biases. These photographs assertively contribute to a new visual culture that focuses on Black beauty, innovation, and connectedness. Airitam points out, “As humans, we believe what we see and we become what we believe.”
​​ ​
​ ​
Live Oak Lightning, Lompoc, California, ,  1978, © John Pfahl,  Gift of Carol and Arthur Goldberg
​ ​ ​

When

5 p.m. Jan. 31, 2022 to 5 p.m. July 23, 2022

The Center for Creative Photography (CCP) in collaboration with the Laboratory for Tree-Ring Research (LTRR) invited digital submissions of images or texts that respond to the question: what stories, images, or ideas do trees inspire for you? Selected submissions were printed and are displayed together at the Bryant Bannister Tree-Ring Building from January 31, 2022 to July 23, 2022.

This community art project is on display in conjunction with the exhibition trees stir in their leaves, in CCP’s Alice Chaiten Baker Interdisciplinary Gallery. 

You can view this community art project at the Laboratory for Tree-Ring Research on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9am - 5pm.

 

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION Trees Stir In Their Leaves:

“To find the wealth of information trees have to share,” writes paleoclimatologist Dr. Valerie Trouet in Tree Story, “we must simply learn how to look.”

From January 22 – July 23, 2022, the Center for Creative Photography (CCP) and the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research (LTRR) will stage installations together that follow historical, cultural, and scientific narratives inspired by trees.

With more than 75 images and objects assembled from CCP and LTRR’s collections, trees stir in their leaves creates a multilayered experience with photography and dendrochronology (the study of annual rings in trees) in CCP’s Alice Chaiten Baker Interdisciplinary Gallery. Learn how visual information and analyses are crucial to tree-ring research and environmental advocacy. Explore trees as a point of departure from which artists and scientists consider nature, place, progress, migration, connectivity, and catastrophe. The installation includes work by such CCP collection artists as Ansel Adams, Lola Álvarez Bravo, Barbara Crane, Kozo Miyoshi, Doug and Mike Starn, Aaron Siskind, Rosalind Solomon, John Yang and more.

Founded as the first of its kind in 1937 at the University of Arizona, LTRR comprises an interdisciplinary research lab, teaching institute, and wood sample archive. At LTRR, the collaboration continues with a community art installation that responds to the prompt: what stories, images or ideas do trees inspire for you? Also at LTRR, trace the histories of dendrochronology; experience the interactive tree-stump and large redwood section exhibit; join tours of the facilities; and view films about lab research on trees.

To complement the installations, the Center’s mobile app, CCP Interactive, offers a guided tour of campus trees along the walk between CCP and LTRR. Designed by the University of Arizona Campus Arboretum, the mobile tour provides a lived experience of the aesthetic, scientific, and cultural connections between people and trees. The tour is also available in printed and mobile formats through the Campus Arboretum website here.

​​ ​
​ ​
Woman and Man smoking pipe both with eyes closed
New Couple Who Closed Their Eyes, Tokyo,  1974, © Kikuji Kawada,  Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona: Purchase, with matching funds from Hitachi America, Ltd.
​ ​ ​

When

9 a.m. Jan. 19, 2022 to 4:30 p.m. June 26, 2022

In the decades following World War II, numerous radical Japanese photographers undertook an aggressive reassessment of the medium. These new non-conformist photographers broke from photojournalism’s norms of objective description and instead adopted a radically expressive, subjective, and critical approach in response to a changing modern world. Publishing in avant-garde zines and underground artists’ journals, their aim was to challenge viewers’ complacency about the medium’s possibilities and question how photography was used to make claims to truth, to shape national identity, and to convey patriotism.

In 1988 and 1990, with the support of two major grants from the Hitachi Corporation, the Center for Creative Photography made a historic acquisition of 87 works by nineteen contemporary Japanese photographers, including Moriyama Daidō, Fukase Masahisa, Eikoh Hosoe, Tōmatsu Shōmei, and Ishiuchi Miyako. These nineteen artists each played a fundamental role in steering the aesthetics and ethos of the postwar period in Japan and beyond and represent vastly ranging perspectives. Farewell Photography: The Hitachi Collection of Postwar Japanese Photographs, 1961-1989 brings together all 87 prints for display for the first time since they were acquired, introducing audiences in the Phoenix and greater Southwest region to this critical moment in Japanese photography.

​​ ​
​ ​
Barbara Bosworth, National Champion Emory Oak, Arizona, 2001, gelatin silver print, 25 x 59.2 cm. Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona: gift of the artist. © Barbara Bosworth
National Champion Emory Oak, Arizona,  2001, Gift of the artist,  ​ ​ © Barbara Bosworth
​ ​ ​

When

10 a.m. Feb. 5, 2022 to 4:30 p.m. July 23, 2022

“To find the wealth of information trees have to share,” writes paleoclimatologist Dr. Valerie Trouet in Tree Story, “we must simply learn how to look.”

From February 5 – July 23, 2022, the Center for Creative Photography (CCP) and the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research (LTRR) will stage installations together that follow historical, cultural, and scientific narratives inspired by trees.

With more than 75 images and objects assembled from CCP and LTRR’s collections, trees stir in their leaves creates a multilayered experience with photography and dendrochronology (the study of annual rings in trees) in CCP’s Alice Chaiten Baker Interdisciplinary Gallery. Learn how visual information and analyses are crucial to tree-ring research and environmental advocacy. Explore trees as a point of departure from which artists and scientists consider nature, place, progress, migration, connectivity, and catastrophe. The installation includes work by such CCP collection artists as Ansel Adams, Lola Álvarez Bravo, Barbara Crane, Kozo Miyoshi, Doug and Mike Starn, Aaron Siskind, Rosalind Solomon, John Yang and more.

Founded as the first of its kind in 1937 at the University of Arizona, LTRR comprises an interdisciplinary research lab, teaching institute, and wood sample archive. At LTRR, the collaboration continues with a community art installation that responds to the prompt: what stories, images or ideas do trees inspire for you? Also at LTRR, trace the histories of dendrochronology; experience the interactive tree-stump and large redwood section exhibit; join tours of the facilities; and view films about lab research on trees.

To complement the installations, the Center’s mobile app, CCP Interactive, offers a guided tour of campus trees along the walk between CCP and LTRR. Designed by the University of Arizona Campus Arboretum, the mobile tour provides a lived experience of the aesthetic, scientific, and cultural connections between people and trees. The tour is also available in printed and mobile formats through the Campus Arboretum website here.

​​ ​
​ ​
​ ​ ​ ​
​ ​ ​

When

9 a.m. June 12, 2021 to 11:59 p.m. July 11, 2021

View the exhibition virtually by location here:

 

The School of Art 2020 MFA Thesis Alumni Exhibition is proud to honor the achievements of their Master of Fine Arts graduates from 2020. During the last year of their coursework, graduates were poised to exhibit their thesis research when we were hit with campus closure because of the pandemic. As a result, these students missed out one of the most intrinsic components of their academic studies, presenting a fully developed body of work to the public in the form of an exhibition. Slowly as the world begins to open we are able to host these artists and reflect on the work they completed in those last months of their degree pursuits. Please join us in celebrating the School of Art's graduates in
the 2020 Alumni Exhibition.

FEATURING ARTISTS: Erin DiGiovanni, Zach Gotschalk, Mijoung Kim, Marisa Lewon, Dorsey Kaufmann, Martin Krafft, Elena Makansi, Leah Netsky, Jared Robison, Marina Shaltout, Kaitlyn Jo Smith, Alex Turner, Kenzie Wells

The public can enjoy the very best artworks created by our 2020 MFA alumni offered in 3D, 360-degree, virtual reality. Physically hung in the galleries, the exhibition is viewed virtually. Utilizing the 3D space capture program from Matterport, museum visitors have the opportunity to virtually ‘walk-through’ the different exhibitions and even view the exhibition in VR, which puts you “in the gallery.” Each piece of artwork has been carefully scanned to facilitate the new online medium and paired with the navigation aspect allows for great user experience.

CCP-MFA_Show_Event_Page_logos
​​ ​
​ ​
George H.W. Bush, Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, United States Presidents Gather Two Weeks before Barack Obama's Inauguration, Oval Office of the White House, Washington, D.C.
George H.W. Bush, Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, United States Presidents Gather Two Weeks before Barack Obama's Inauguration, Oval Office of the White House, Washington, D.C.,  2009, © © Center for Creative Photography, Arizona Board of Regents, 
​ ​ ​

When

5 p.m. March 9, 2020 to 5 p.m. March 21, 2020

Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist David Hume Kennerly has documented momentous events and people including politicians, entertainment figures and a space shuttle liftoff. A pop-up exhibition of 25 of his prints are on display at Main Gate Square and inside the Tucson Marriott University Park hotel.

Sponsored by Marshall Foundation, established in 1930 by Louise Marshall, seeks to enhance the lives of the citizens of Tucson, AZ and Pima County through its support of charitable and educational institutions. The Foundation focuses its community giving on early childhood through undergraduate education and supportive wrap-around social services to aid underserved populations in attaining education. Marshall Foundation also funds projects, programs and scholarships at the University of Arizona, including post-secondary levels.

​​ ​
​ ​
​ ​ ​ ​
​ ​ ​

When

5 p.m. Aug. 24, 2021 to 5 p.m. Dec. 4, 2021

Photojournalism 20/20: A Think Tank for an Unimaginable Present

The first activation of the Center for Creative Photography’s Alice Chaiten Baker Interdisciplinary Gallery was planned to be a close study of photojournalism, of how we can raise thoughtful, critical questions about the images in our news. Then 2020 swerved. Nearly overnight, photographs, together with videos and teleconferences, operated with renewed urgency. It was as though “lens-based culture” turned into our main connective tissue, all the while laying bare our disconnections.

During a period of physical confinement, worldwide protests for racial justice and systemic change, and a presidential election season, how do photographs in our news feeds help reveal the world around us? By the same token, how do photographs complicate how we see ourselves and one another? Reimagined as an in-progress think tank, Photojournalism 20/20: A Think Tank for an Unimaginable Present combines photographs, lectures, essays, and journals drawn from the Center’s collection with the latest about 2020 from mainstream news outlets, social media platforms, and thought leaders on photography-related topics.

Fotoperiodismo 20/20: Un laboratorio de ideas para un presente inimaginable

La primera activación de la Galería Interdisciplinar Alice Chaiten Baker del Centro de Fotografía Creativa se planeó para ser un estudio exhaustivo del fotoperiodismo, de cómo podemos plantear preguntas profundas y críticas sobre las imágenes que acompañan a nuestras noticias. Luego, el 2020 dio un giro brusco. Casi de la noche a la mañana, las fotografías, junto con los videos y las teleconferencias, operaron con renovada urgencia. Fue como si los medios digitales y fotográficos se convirtieran en nuestro principal tejido conectivo, mientras dejaba al descubierto nuestras desconexiones.

Durante un período de confinamiento físico, de protestas mundiales por la justicia racial y el cambio sistémico, y de una temporada de elecciones presidenciales, ¿cómo las fotografías en nuestros canales de noticias ayudan a revelar el mundo que nos rodea? De la misma manera, ¿cómo las fotografías complican la forma en que nos vemos a nosotros mismos y a los demás? Reimaginado como un laboratorio de ideas abierto, Fotoperiodismo 20/20 combina fotografías, conferencias, ensayos y revistas extraídas de la colección del Centro con lo último de los principales medios de comunicación, plataformas de redes sociales e intelectuales de la fotografía.

Photojournalism 20/20: A Think Tank for an Unimaginable Present will be on view in CCP's Alice Chaiten Baker Interdisciplinary Gallery until December 4, 2021. Esta exposición está disponible en español.

​​ ​
​ ​
Chicago School Boycott, 1963-64 (from the series "That May Affect Their Hearts and Minds," 1963-64),  1963-1964, © Center for Creative Photography, Arizona Board of Regents,  Marion Palfi Archive/Gift of the Menninger Foundation and Martin Magner, The Center for Creative Photography
​ ​ ​

When

5 p.m. July 21, 2021 to 5 p.m. Jan. 2, 2022

This retrospective exhibition will survey the career of Marion Palfi (1907–1978), who produced one of the most important visual documents of American injustice of the twentieth century. Freedom Must Be Lived: Marion Palfi’s America, 1940-1978 features over one hundred prints and numerous archival materials drawn exclusively from the Center for Creative Photography’s vast Marion Palfi Archive, including photobooks, magazine spreads, research journals, and grant applications. Many of these prints and expository archival materials have never before been exhibited or published and will offer an unprecedented opportunity to draw new insights into the work.

Palfi’s philosophy of using photography to influence social change shaped her vision and distinguished her career. A German immigrant to the United States during World War II, Palfi arrived in Los Angeles to find a reality far from the myth of the American Dream. Outraged at the economic, racial, and social inequalities she encountered, she spent over three decades traveling throughout the United States documenting troubled communities to expose the links between racism and poverty. As a self-described “social research photographer,” Palfi aspired for her photographs to live in the world and to effect social change. Her work was featured in numerous American periodicals, including Ebony and The New York Times. Sponsors for her work included the Council Against Intolerance in America, the NAACP, and the New York State Committee on Discrimination in Housing.

Each of the photographer’s four major projects are represented in the exhibition: her piercing nationwide study of children living in poverty; her decades-long civil rights activism documenting the effects of systemic racism against African Americans; her research on the abject conditions of aging in New York; and her revelatory pictures, funded by a 1967 Guggenheim fellowship, of the forced relocation of Native Americans off of reservations in the Southwest. Weaving together over three decades of work, the exhibition elucidates Palfi’s sustained focus on themes of inequity, solitude, racial victimization. Taken as a whole, it elucidates the photographer’s elegiac crusade for human rights and presents a cumulative photographic record that resonates with many of the social concerns still plaguing our country today.

Freedom Must Be Lived: Marion Palfi’s America is organized by Phoenix Art Museum and the Center for Creative Photography.  

​​ ​
​ ​
​ ​ ​ ​
​ ​ ​

When

5 p.m. Oct. 10, 2019 to 5 p.m. Oct. 13, 2019

As a featured component of the University of Arizona’s Family Weekend 2019, the Center for Creative Photography has designed its first-ever outdoor pop-up exhibition.  Including 63 images by photojournalist David Hume Kennerly (b. 1947), the exhibition shows the Pulitzer-prize winning photographer’s breadth of subjects.  Included are his early political pictures of Robert Kennedy, Richard Nixon, and Gerald Ford; entertainment images including Mick Jagger, Miles Davis, and Jerry Seinfeld; sports figures Mary Lou Retton, Mohammed Ali, and Carl Lewis; recent political figures President Donald Trump, Senator Elizabeth Warren, and former President Jimmy Carter; and news events including a space shuttle lift off, presidential inaugurations, and a chilling view of the Penatgon on 9/11.

Kennerly has documented momentous events for newspaper and magazine publications, and as photographer to President Gerald Ford, for over fifty years. His photographs bring us closer to the world leaders who made the news, and to those impacted by their actions.

The pop-up exhibition will complement an exhibition of 25 of his fine art prints on display in the University of Arizona's Old Main, including a tender view of Arizonan Linda Ronstadt, profound pictures of Vietnam soldiers, an early color portrait of Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, and Kennerly’s prize-winning frame of the Mohammad Ali-Joe Frazier fight.

The Center for Creative Photography is excited to be integrated into the activities of this popular fall event.  It is a powerful opportunity for Kennerly's work to be introduced to the campus community for students, parents, staff, faculty, and visitors to experience and enjoy.

Learn more about the David Hume Kennerly Archive.

Presented by Bank of America, Marshall Foundation, Arizona Arts, and Center for Creative Photography

Subscribe to RSS - Exhibition