Exhibition

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John Cage,  c.1947-1954, Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona, © Estate of Hazel Larsen Archer, 
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When

9:30 a.m. Feb. 25, 2023 to 4:30 p.m. Aug. 5, 2023

Where

CCP Heritage Gallery

Sessions on Creative Photography is one comprehensive look at the boundary-breaking career of Hazel Larsen Archer, from her instrumental work in photography within mid century avant-garde art circles to her transformative approach to photo education. Archer embraced experimentation; challenged expectations and encouraged a radical depth of seeing; and was concerned both with photography and the experience of life itself. Linda McCartney, a prominent student of Archer’s in Tucson in the early 1960s, reflected, “She inspired me to become a photographer.” 

This exhibition is intent on generating meaningful conversation between creative practices today and the history that shapes those practices. Particularly crucial is to reshape the parameters of photography’s histories by introducing largely overlooked or marginalized perspectives like that of Archer, who was influential to Tucson’s vibrant arts community. Over the course of the spring, Sessions on Creative Photography will evolve to include the interdisciplinary projects of students in the undergraduate course, “Introduction to Applied Humanities,” taught by Dr. Jacqueline Barrios. The students’ projects will be exhibited in two parts: within CCP’s Heritage Gallery and in a to-be-announced community space in Tucson.

Sessions in Creative Photography is generously supported by the Marshall Foundation.

 

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“Linda, New York”,  1967, © Paul McCartney,  Photographer: Linda McCartney
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When

10 a.m. Feb. 25, 2023 to 4:30 p.m. Aug. 5, 2023

Curated by members of the photographer’s family, this exhibition has its North American debut at the Center for Creative Photography and covers Linda McCartney’s whole career, from 1965 to 1997.

Featuring 176 photographs and additional archival materials that offer insight into her working methods, the exhibition is presented in three sections: Family, Photographic Experimentation, and Artists. Family features poignant and direct accounts of her life as mother, wife, and animal activist. Having moved to London with her new husband Paul in 1969, Linda documented her extraordinary version of domestic life, and these self-portraits, slices from life, and portraits of her husband, children, and beloved animal companions provide powerful access to her particular perspective. Throughout her photographic career, McCartney "sketched" by taking Polaroid images, experimented with various photographic processes, explored color and black-and-white film, and partnered with artistic collaborators. The Photographic Experimentation section includes several artworks that are unique to the CCP version of the exhibition. In the third section, Artists, we see McCartney's early portraits of the dynamic 1960s music scene which capture the vulnerability of future world-conquering rock stars.

McCartney was the first woman photographer to have an image featured on the cover of Rolling Stone; her unparalleled access to The Beatles – the biggest band in the world at that time – allowed her to chronicle the members and their behind-the-scenes; and her own role as a founding member of Wings gave her yet another point of view on musical stardom. The range of works in the exhibition, including never-before-seen Tucson views, reflect the spontaneity and ease of her photographic style. 

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Truman Capote, writer, New York, October 10, 1955,  ​ ​ © The Richard Avedon Foundation,  Richard Avedon Archive/Gift of the artist
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When

Midnight Sept. 22, 2022 to 11:59 p.m. Jan. 29, 2023

Richard Avedon: Relationships, envisioned by Chief Curator Rebecca Senf for the Tucson galleries of the Center for Creative Photography in 2018, has been expanded and will go on view in Milan, Italy starting this September.

The exhibition, which features both Avedon's portraiture and fashion photography, will be installed in the Royal Palace in Milan, which was for years the city's seat of government, and now serves as a cultural center and exhibition space visited by half a million visitors a year. It will present the Center's exhibition of over 100 prints in a series of galleries featuring Avedon's early and late fashion, portraits of performers, artists, politicians, and will include a special "Vogue" room with Avedon's magazine covers. Additionally, the exhibition sponsor, Versace, had a long-standing creative relationship with Richard Avedon, and the exhibition includes images from their fashion advertising campaigns. The exhibition boasts a new publication--printed in both Italian and in English--to accompany and amplify the installation of prints. The opening event coincides with Milan's Fashion Week.

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Untitled #4,  1981, © Joyce Neimanas,  Gift of the artist
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When

10 a.m. Sept. 6, 2022 to 4:30 p.m. Dec. 9, 2022

Why Color? is the first class residency piloted by the Center for Creative Photography + Art & Visual Culture Education in the School of Art. Simultaneously a classroom and installation, the project launches in early September, inviting University of Arizona graduate students in the course “Participatory Practices and Edu-Curation in Exhibitions” to design an exhibition from CCP’s collection of color photography. The goal? To create an art-influenced community experience that can be both educational and meaningful, as well as collaborative.

In Why Color?, the exhibition is accomplished in two stages. The first is a review of color processes, showing how experimentation and evolution is at the foundation of color photography. There is also a collection of books, games, and archival reproductions to explore, topics ranging from the effects of color on emotion to Polaroid pictures, from cultural histories of color to photographers’ work prints.

The second stage, set to be completed in early November 2022, realizes the semester-long work of participating students. Themes are ultimately up to the graduate students, their specific interests and concerns, and will also be securely rooted in ideas of community, collaboration, and interdisciplinary engagement by way of color photography.

Highlights include photographs by Lalla Essaydi, Mark Klett, Reagan Louie, Joyce Neimanas, Catherine Opie, and Edward Weston.

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Nan Letènite (In Eternity), 2021,  ​ ​ © Widline Cadet, from the Seremoni Disparisyon (Ritual [Dis]Appearance) series,  Collection of the artist.
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When

10 a.m. July 20, 2022 to 5 p.m. Feb. 12, 2023

Showcasing more than 70 portraits, landscapes, self-portraits, and family archival images, And Let It Remain So: Women of the African Diaspora presents the nuanced perspectives of five photographers who are exploring their experiences of the African Diaspora, defined by the voluntary and forced movement of Africans and their descendants over centuries through waves of migration and enslavement.

Featured works by Widline Cadet, Jasmine Clarke, Hellen Gaudence, Nadiya I. Nacordia, and Sasha Phyars-Burgess reflect specific locales, general memories, and multilayered family experiences, drawing on elements from the past and present to consider an imagined future. Experienced collectively, these dynamic photographs illuminate shared and separate understandings of family and history, place and displacement, migration and mobility, and belonging and community, all informed by individual diasporic realities.

The exhibition is curated by Aaron Turner, a regular collaborator with the Center for Creative Photography and an African-American photographer and educator based in Arkansas. Turner’s own photography focuses on the Arkansas and Mississippi Deltas and his reflections on the place of the Civil Rights movement within his and his family’s experience. He is an Assistant Professor of Art at University of Arkansas, School of Art, and the Director of the Center for Art as Lived Experience.

And Let it Remain So: Women of the African Diaspora is organized by Phoenix Art Museum and the Center for Creative Photography. It is made possible through the generosity of the Museum’s Circles of Support and Museum Members.

ccp and phoenix art logo
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​ ​ ​ ​ Alanna Airitam, "Saint Sugar Hill", 2017, courtesy of and © Alanna Airitam
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When

10 a.m. April 16, 2022 to 4 p.m. Oct. 29, 2022
Alanna Airitam’s photographic project, “The Golden Age” celebrates a vision of Black Americans that is uplifting, inspiring, and empowering. In ten luscious and elegant large-scale portraits, the artist features contemporary African Americans as symbolic saints who are simultaneously magnificent and powerful.
 
The title refers to an era of portrait painting when Dutch Old Masters like Rembrandt van Rijn and Johannes Vermeer created images of the merchant class to highlight their sitters’ stature and wealth. Airitam uses the trappings of these centuries-old oil paintings--with their dramatic lighting, rich fabrics, and symbolic items--in contemporary portraits. She combines historical references with the Harlem Renaissance period of artistic efflorescence in the early 20th century; each portrait is given a fictional title, combining “Saint” with a Harlem, New York, street name. “This act of reawakening and reconfirming value in one’s self-identity helped me resist the despondency I was experiencing from the increasing number of violent acts against the Black community in America,” says Airitam. "In this way, art has been an act of rebellion and a source of activism for me.”
 
“The Golden Age” belongs to a larger discussion about omission and erasure of Black experiences within the telling of North American history and the damaging impact of art historical biases. These photographs assertively contribute to a new visual culture that focuses on Black beauty, innovation, and connectedness. Airitam points out, “As humans, we believe what we see and we become what we believe.”
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Live Oak Lightning, Lompoc, California, ,  1978, © John Pfahl,  Gift of Carol and Arthur Goldberg
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When

5 p.m. Jan. 31, 2022 to 5 p.m. July 22, 2022

The Center for Creative Photography (CCP) in collaboration with the Laboratory for Tree-Ring Research (LTRR) invited digital submissions of images or texts that respond to the question: what stories, images, or ideas do trees inspire for you? Selected submissions were printed and are displayed together at the Bryant Bannister Tree-Ring Building from January 31, 2022 to July 22, 2022.

This community art project is on display in conjunction with the exhibition trees stir in their leaves, in CCP’s Alice Chaiten Baker Interdisciplinary Gallery. 

You can view this community art project at the Laboratory for Tree-Ring Research on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9am - 5pm.

 

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION Trees Stir In Their Leaves:

“To find the wealth of information trees have to share,” writes paleoclimatologist Dr. Valerie Trouet in Tree Story, “we must simply learn how to look.”

From January 22 – July 22, 2022, the Center for Creative Photography (CCP) and the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research (LTRR) will stage installations together that follow historical, cultural, and scientific narratives inspired by trees.

With more than 75 images and objects assembled from CCP and LTRR’s collections, trees stir in their leaves creates a multilayered experience with photography and dendrochronology (the study of annual rings in trees) in CCP’s Alice Chaiten Baker Interdisciplinary Gallery. Learn how visual information and analyses are crucial to tree-ring research and environmental advocacy. Explore trees as a point of departure from which artists and scientists consider nature, place, progress, migration, connectivity, and catastrophe. The installation includes work by such CCP collection artists as Ansel Adams, Lola Álvarez Bravo, Barbara Crane, Kozo Miyoshi, Doug and Mike Starn, Aaron Siskind, Rosalind Solomon, John Yang and more.

Founded as the first of its kind in 1937 at the University of Arizona, LTRR comprises an interdisciplinary research lab, teaching institute, and wood sample archive. At LTRR, the collaboration continues with a community art installation that responds to the prompt: what stories, images or ideas do trees inspire for you? Also at LTRR, trace the histories of dendrochronology; experience the interactive tree-stump and large redwood section exhibit; join tours of the facilities; and view films about lab research on trees.

To complement the installations, the Center’s mobile app, CCP Interactive, offers a guided tour of campus trees along the walk between CCP and LTRR. Designed by the University of Arizona Campus Arboretum, the mobile tour provides a lived experience of the aesthetic, scientific, and cultural connections between people and trees. The tour is also available in printed and mobile formats through the Campus Arboretum website here.

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Protester with his arms up in a crowd
Hands Up Don't Shoot,  captured 2016; print 2021, © Terrell Groggins My Art My Rules,  Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona: Center for Creative Photography Photojournalism Fund
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When

10 a.m. Feb. 5, 2022 to 4:30 p.m. March 26, 2022

Small front room of main gallery

During the last four years, the Center for Creative Photography created a process and funding source for diversifying our collection. We began by analyzing existing holdings, determined strengths, and identified where underrepresented artists and gaps in the collection existed. It was clear that there were many perspectives, as well as a range of contemporary voices, not represented in our holdings. Through three auctions of duplicate holdings in our collection, the Center funded an endowment which is being used to purchase work to diversify the collection. This exhibition of new acquisitions presents three rotations of three artworks each and serves as our first opportunity to share these new works with our community.  

Trios: Looking Close at Three New Acquisitions offers a concentrated opportunity for visitors to know some of the Center’s newest works. Each photograph is shared along with an observation from a member of the CCP staff and student staff, and a statement from the artist. Our intention is to open a valuable space for contemplation, close looking, and reflection with singular works of art. Designed to be an evolving exhibition, we will reinstall in February and March, sharing three new prints each time. Tapping into the global slow art movement that promotes quality experiences with art, we share prompts to support extended exploration of each work in the gallery. Visitors are invited to share their experience by posting to social media and tagging #CCPSlowArt or adding their comment on an in-gallery Slow Art wall.  

In the early months of 2022, as the Center reopens the front room of our main galleries for the first time since our pandemic-related closure in March 2020, we find ourselves in a unique situation. Our building and digital infrastructure are undergoing renovations to improve our ability to care for the collections and make them accessible. This process will be explored and illustrated through text and image in the gallery as well. Although much of our main galleries are impacted in that process, they will reopen to the public fully in January of 2023. 

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Woman and Man smoking pipe both with eyes closed
New Couple Who Closed Their Eyes, Tokyo,  1974, © Kikuji Kawada,  Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona: Purchase, with matching funds from Hitachi America, Ltd.
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When

9 a.m. Jan. 19, 2022 to 4:30 p.m. June 26, 2022

In the decades following World War II, numerous radical Japanese photographers undertook an aggressive reassessment of the medium. These new non-conformist photographers broke from photojournalism’s norms of objective description and instead adopted a radically expressive, subjective, and critical approach in response to a changing modern world. Publishing in avant-garde zines and underground artists’ journals, their aim was to challenge viewers’ complacency about the medium’s possibilities and question how photography was used to make claims to truth, to shape national identity, and to convey patriotism.

In 1988 and 1990, with the support of two major grants from the Hitachi Corporation, the Center for Creative Photography made a historic acquisition of 87 works by nineteen contemporary Japanese photographers, including Moriyama Daidō, Fukase Masahisa, Eikoh Hosoe, Tōmatsu Shōmei, and Ishiuchi Miyako. These nineteen artists each played a fundamental role in steering the aesthetics and ethos of the postwar period in Japan and beyond and represent vastly ranging perspectives. Farewell Photography: The Hitachi Collection of Postwar Japanese Photographs, 1961-1989 brings together all 87 prints for display for the first time since they were acquired, introducing audiences in the Phoenix and greater Southwest region to this critical moment in Japanese photography.

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Barbara Bosworth, National Champion Emory Oak, Arizona, 2001, gelatin silver print, 25 x 59.2 cm. Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona: gift of the artist. © Barbara Bosworth
National Champion Emory Oak, Arizona,  2001, Gift of the artist,  ​ ​ © Barbara Bosworth
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When

10 a.m. Feb. 5, 2022 to 4:30 p.m. July 22, 2022

“To find the wealth of information trees have to share,” writes paleoclimatologist Dr. Valerie Trouet in Tree Story, “we must simply learn how to look.”

From February 5 – July 22, 2022, the Center for Creative Photography (CCP) and the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research (LTRR) will stage installations together that follow historical, cultural, and scientific narratives inspired by trees.

With more than 75 images and objects assembled from CCP and LTRR’s collections, trees stir in their leaves creates a multilayered experience with photography and dendrochronology (the study of annual rings in trees) in CCP’s Alice Chaiten Baker Interdisciplinary Gallery. Learn how visual information and analyses are crucial to tree-ring research and environmental advocacy. Explore trees as a point of departure from which artists and scientists consider nature, place, progress, migration, connectivity, and catastrophe. The installation includes work by such CCP collection artists as Ansel Adams, Lola Álvarez Bravo, Barbara Crane, Kozo Miyoshi, Doug and Mike Starn, Aaron Siskind, Rosalind Solomon, John Yang and more.

Founded as the first of its kind in 1937 at the University of Arizona, LTRR comprises an interdisciplinary research lab, teaching institute, and wood sample archive. At LTRR, the collaboration continues with a community art installation that responds to the prompt: what stories, images or ideas do trees inspire for you? Also at LTRR, trace the histories of dendrochronology; experience the interactive tree-stump and large redwood section exhibit; join tours of the facilities; and view films about lab research on trees.

To complement the installations, the Center’s mobile app, CCP Interactive, offers a guided tour of campus trees along the walk between CCP and LTRR. Designed by the University of Arizona Campus Arboretum, the mobile tour provides a lived experience of the aesthetic, scientific, and cultural connections between people and trees. The tour is also available in printed and mobile formats through the Campus Arboretum website here.

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